Maiden’s blush
Ingredients: 2 oz gin, 1 oz absinthe, 1 teaspoon grenadine. Shake with ice and strain into a chilled glass.
Source: The Cocktail Bible
This seems to be an atypical recipe for a maiden’s blush—it usually includes tripe-sec and orange juice, not absinthe. The flavor of absinthe was a little overwhelming in this one, honestly, especially against the gin. Maybe with a more neutral-tasting gin like Hendrick’s it would work better.

Maiden’s blush

Ingredients: 2 oz gin, 1 oz absinthe, 1 teaspoon grenadine. Shake with ice and strain into a chilled glass.

Source: The Cocktail Bible

This seems to be an atypical recipe for a maiden’s blush—it usually includes tripe-sec and orange juice, not absinthe. The flavor of absinthe was a little overwhelming in this one, honestly, especially against the gin. Maybe with a more neutral-tasting gin like Hendrick’s it would work better.

Green Beast
Ingredients: 1 oz each lime juice, absinthe, and simple syrup; combine in a highball glass with ice and add 4 oz water.
Source: Forgot, sorry!
This is another cocktail I thought would rock, but… meh. I don’t think the other ingredients did the absinthe any favors on this one. I’d almost rather just drink absinthe with water. But on the plus side, it was easy to make!

Green Beast

Ingredients: 1 oz each lime juice, absinthe, and simple syrup; combine in a highball glass with ice and add 4 oz water.

Source: Forgot, sorry!

This is another cocktail I thought would rock, but… meh. I don’t think the other ingredients did the absinthe any favors on this one. I’d almost rather just drink absinthe with water. But on the plus side, it was easy to make!

NOLA martini
Ingredients: A dash of absinthe (or Pernod), 1 oz dry vermouth, 4 oz gin. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled glass.
Source: The Cocktail Bible
This might be my new favorite martini recipe! I usually favor a sweeter martini, but the addition of absinthe in this one balances out the gin nicely. I love the hint of licorice taste from the absinthe, too. Definitely recommend this one, especially if you like absinthe!

NOLA martini

Ingredients: A dash of absinthe (or Pernod), 1 oz dry vermouth, 4 oz gin. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled glass.

Source: The Cocktail Bible

This might be my new favorite martini recipe! I usually favor a sweeter martini, but the addition of absinthe in this one balances out the gin nicely. I love the hint of licorice taste from the absinthe, too. Definitely recommend this one, especially if you like absinthe!

Obituary cocktail
Ingredients: 2 oz gin, 1/4 dry vermouth, 1/4 oz absinthe. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled glass.
Source: The website of an absinthe distillery that I’ve since lost. However, you can also find the cocktail recipe on cocktails.about.com.
Whoa puppies. This cocktail isn’t for light drinkers; it really packs a punch, both flavor-wise and alcohol-wise. You have to be a big fan of both gin and absinthe to enjoy this one. Admittedly, I like both, but this cocktail was a little… much. Maybe in the summer it would be better.

Obituary cocktail

Ingredients: 2 oz gin, 1/4 dry vermouth, 1/4 oz absinthe. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled glass.

Source: The website of an absinthe distillery that I’ve since lost. However, you can also find the cocktail recipe on cocktails.about.com.

Whoa puppies. This cocktail isn’t for light drinkers; it really packs a punch, both flavor-wise and alcohol-wise. You have to be a big fan of both gin and absinthe to enjoy this one. Admittedly, I like both, but this cocktail was a little… much. Maybe in the summer it would be better.

Remember the Maine
Ingredients: Roll a splash of absinthe around the inside of a chilled glass. Stir 2 oz rye whiskey, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, 1/4 oz cherry-infused brandy, and 2 dashes Angostura bitters with ice and strain into the glass.
Source: Bitters: A History
In 1898, “Remember the Maine” became a rallying cry of the Spanish-American War and a resulting cocktail. Honestly, I was a little disappointed in this cocktail. It’s basically a Manhattan with absinthe, but isn’t as good as other absinthe cocktails I’ve tried.

Remember the Maine

Ingredients: Roll a splash of absinthe around the inside of a chilled glass. Stir 2 oz rye whiskey, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, 1/4 oz cherry-infused brandy, and 2 dashes Angostura bitters with ice and strain into the glass.

Source: Bitters: A History

In 1898, “Remember the Maine” became a rallying cry of the Spanish-American War and a resulting cocktail. Honestly, I was a little disappointed in this cocktail. It’s basically a Manhattan with absinthe, but isn’t as good as other absinthe cocktails I’ve tried.

Monkey Gland
Ingredients: Splash of absinthe, orange slice (optional), 1 1/2 oz gin, 1 oz orange juice, 1/4 oz grenadine. Shake with ice and strain into a small, chilled glass.
Source: The Essential Cocktail by Dale Degroff
Degroff calls this drink “Victorian Viagra.” The name monkey refers to a medical procedure using monkey testicles that was supposed to be an aphrodisiac. Wow, you’ve got to be pretty desperate to try that. Anyway, I thought it was an appropriate name because this is a very odd-tasting drink that I can see being a great accompaniment to a viewing of Godzilla or King Kong. Not sure I would drink it otherwise.

Monkey Gland

Ingredients: Splash of absinthe, orange slice (optional), 1 1/2 oz gin, 1 oz orange juice, 1/4 oz grenadine. Shake with ice and strain into a small, chilled glass.

Source: The Essential Cocktail by Dale Degroff

Degroff calls this drink “Victorian Viagra.” The name monkey refers to a medical procedure using monkey testicles that was supposed to be an aphrodisiac. Wow, you’ve got to be pretty desperate to try that. Anyway, I thought it was an appropriate name because this is a very odd-tasting drink that I can see being a great accompaniment to a viewing of Godzilla or King Kong. Not sure I would drink it otherwise.

Green Fairy
Ingredients: 1 oz Pernod “absinthe”, 1 oz water, juice of 1 lemon, 1/2 egg white, 1 dash bitters. Shake with ice and strain into a chilled glass.
Source: Pernodabsinthe.com
This is a traditional absinthe cocktail, but with Pernod (which is more of an anisette these days), I didn’t get a lot of flavor and texture from this cocktail. I prefer a sour for this liquor if I’m going to make a cocktail of it. Also, it wasn’t really green—more yellow. So that was disappointing.

Green Fairy

Ingredients: 1 oz Pernod “absinthe”, 1 oz water, juice of 1 lemon, 1/2 egg white, 1 dash bitters. Shake with ice and strain into a chilled glass.

Source: Pernodabsinthe.com

This is a traditional absinthe cocktail, but with Pernod (which is more of an anisette these days), I didn’t get a lot of flavor and texture from this cocktail. I prefer a sour for this liquor if I’m going to make a cocktail of it. Also, it wasn’t really green—more yellow. So that was disappointing.

Death in the afternoon
Ingredients: Pour about 1 1/2 oz absinthe into a flute, top with chilled champagne.
Source: wikipedia.com; originally found in So Red the Nose, or Breath in the Afternoon, 1935.
Guys. I was SO EXCITED to try this cocktail because 1. Ernest Hemingway invented it; and 2. it sounded awesome. Absinthe and champagne together! So classy and writerly!
Unfortunately, I have to report that this cocktail was super-gross. Like I almost gave up and tossed it down the sink, but I didn’t because that would a waste of good (-ish) champagne. I am never taking drinking advice from Ernest Hemingway again!!!!11!!!1!! Even Toulouse-Lautrec’s cocktail was better than this.

Death in the afternoon

Ingredients: Pour about 1 1/2 oz absinthe into a flute, top with chilled champagne.

Source: wikipedia.com; originally found in So Red the Nose, or Breath in the Afternoon, 1935.

Guys. I was SO EXCITED to try this cocktail because 1. Ernest Hemingway invented it; and 2. it sounded awesome. Absinthe and champagne together! So classy and writerly!

Unfortunately, I have to report that this cocktail was super-gross. Like I almost gave up and tossed it down the sink, but I didn’t because that would a waste of good (-ish) champagne. I am never taking drinking advice from Ernest Hemingway again!!!!11!!!1!! Even Toulouse-Lautrec’s cocktail was better than this.

Tremblement de terre
Ingredients: 1 oz brandy, 1 oz absinthe. Swirled together in a wine goblet, may be served with ice.
Source: wikipedia
This cocktail was invented by 19th-century artist Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. I have to confess I was a little nervous to try any drink Toulouse-Lautrec invented, especially since the name (“earthquake” in French) is supposed to describe the effects of the cocktail.
It does pack a punch, but fortunately I made a small amount, and it tasted much better with ice. I probably won’t have this a lot; but really, kind of cool to be drinking something Lautrec invented!

Tremblement de terre

Ingredients: 1 oz brandy, 1 oz absinthe. Swirled together in a wine goblet, may be served with ice.

Source: wikipedia

This cocktail was invented by 19th-century artist Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. I have to confess I was a little nervous to try any drink Toulouse-Lautrec invented, especially since the name (“earthquake” in French) is supposed to describe the effects of the cocktail.

It does pack a punch, but fortunately I made a small amount, and it tasted much better with ice. I probably won’t have this a lot; but really, kind of cool to be drinking something Lautrec invented!

Waldorf
Ingredients: 2 oz whiskey, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, 3 dashes bitters, a dash of absinthe. Rinse a chilled glass with absinthe, shake the other ingredients together, and strain into the glass.
Source: See Mix Drink
This drink is similar to a sazerac, but without Peychaud’s bitters or sazerac whiskey. It didn’t knock my socks off or anything, but as a poor man’s sazerac it was okay.

Waldorf

Ingredients: 2 oz whiskey, 3/4 oz sweet vermouth, 3 dashes bitters, a dash of absinthe. Rinse a chilled glass with absinthe, shake the other ingredients together, and strain into the glass.

Source: See Mix Drink

This drink is similar to a sazerac, but without Peychaud’s bitters or sazerac whiskey. It didn’t knock my socks off or anything, but as a poor man’s sazerac it was okay.